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3 ways ASEAN can build a stronger future post-pandemic

The pandemic, which does not recognize national borders, is accelerating coordinated action to deploy many of the region’s on-going initiatives and programmes, which will contribute to the block’s deeper integration.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has caused prolonged socio-economic disruptions in the ASEAN region, exposing fundamental weaknesses and vulnerabilities in various sectors. Yet with steady measures in countries including Viet Nam and Singapore, coupled with the promise of vaccine rollouts, there is optimism for a speedy recovery.

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If the region’s growth can be restored to pre-pandemic levels, its combined GDP is projected to be the fourth-largest economy in the world by 2030. To accomplish this, the region must prioritize several key actions to support sustainable, resilient growth.

Ensure effective cooperation

Effective cooperation among ASEAN member states has been the fundamental principle for the community since its inception.

The pandemic, which does not recognize national borders, is accelerating coordinated action to deploy many of the region’s on-going initiatives and programmes, which will contribute to the block’s deeper integration.

Office workers wearing protective face masks cross a street, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in the central business district in Singapore January 11, 2021. REUTERS/Edgar Su - RC2J5L9VN229

Together, ASEAN governments agreed to establish the COVID-19 ASEAN Response Fund, set up the ASEAN Regional Reserve of Medical Supplies, and most recently approved the Comprehensive Recovery Framework for ASEAN and its Implementation Plan (ACRF). The framework sets broad strategies and implementing measures to address the region’s socio-economic challenges in three different phases from short-term reopening stage to medium- and long-term recovery stage and longer-term resilience and sustainability.

Besides cooperation between its own members, ASEAN also actively embraced multilateral cooperation with external partners.

ASEAN concluded the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) Agreement with five of its key trading partners: Australia, China, Japan, Korea and New Zealand. Representing 30% of the global GDP and 30% of the world population, RCEP is the biggest regional free trade agreement to date and is projected by the Peterson Institute for International Economics to add $186 billion annually to the world economy by 2030 through improved regional trade.

ASEAN has also recognized the importance of public-private partnership, especially to respond to future public health emergencies and address regional issues such as infrastructure gaps, financing gaps and skills gap.

During the pandemic, examples of these partnerships include the cooperation between logistic providers, donors and humanitarian agencies for delivering hygienic supplies, offering a free mobile health app, forming country-specific industry-led alliances for actions, and launching joint action to improve efficiency for COVID-19 vaccine and medical equipment imports.

Expand connectivity and digital transformation

ASEAN was quick to address how the disruptions to supply chains and connectivity would destabilize economic recovery. The Hanoi Plan of Action on Strengthening ASEAN Economic Cooperation and Supply Chain Connectivity in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic was a collective response to collaborate on the flow of essential goods, including food, medicines and medical supplies, while also enhancing the resilience of its regional supply chains.

The region also witnessed an unprecedented level of digital transformation. A survey conducted by the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Sea, on more than 60,000 ASEAN youths revealed that ASEAN youths adjusted to the COVID-19 environment by significantly increasing their digital footprint: 87% of youths increased usage of at least one digital tool during the pandemic, 42% of youths picked up at least one new digital tool, and one in every four e-commerce sellers was a first-time user. A significant majority of youths confirmed their intended permanent use of the digital tools beyond the pandemic.

To support this trend with policy and regulation, ASEAN moved forward with regional policy efforts, including a framework for cross-border payments, a plan to promote smart manufacturing and guidelines for the 5G ecosystem. ASEAN is also developing a consolidated strategy on the Fourth Industrial…

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Asean

Supporting disadvantaged women key to achieving SDGs in ASEAN

The study, which holds a gender lens up to each of the SDGs of the 2030 Agenda, confirms that when two or more forms of discrimination overlap, barriers increase

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Supporting disadvantaged women key to achieving SDGs in ASEAN, new data shows

JAKARTA, 1 March 2021 – Women and girls across South-East Asia who are members of an ethnic minority, live in a rural location, or suffer from poverty are at greatest risk of being left behind despite the region’s recent progress in gender equality, according to a new report by ASEAN and UN Women.

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Ecommerce

Has Covid-19 prompted the Belt and Road Initiative to go green?

Oxford Business Group

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Has Covid-19 prompted the Belt and Road Initiative to go green?
– Covid-19 led to a slowdown in BRI projects
– Chinese overseas investment dropped off in 2020
– Government remains committed to the wide-ranging infrastructure programme
– Sustainability, health and digital to be the new cornerstones of the initiative 

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Following a year of coronavirus-related disruptions, China appears to be placing a greater focus on sustainable, digital and health-related projects in its flagship Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).

As OBG outlined in April last year, the onset of Covid-19 prompted questions about the future direction of the BRI.

Launched in 2013, the BRI is an ambitious international initiative that aims to revive ancient Silk Road trade routes through large-scale infrastructure development.

By the start of 2020 some 2951 BRI-linked projects – valued at a total of $3.9trn – were planned or under way across the world.

However, as borders closed and lockdowns were imposed, progress stalled on a number of major BRI infrastructure developments.

In June China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced that 30-40% of BRI projects had been affected by the virus, while a further 20% had been “seriously affected”. Restrictions on the flow of Chinese workers and construction supplies were cited as factors behind project suspensions or slowdowns in Pakistan, Cambodia and Indonesia, among other countries.

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Startups

Vietnam Loship secures investment from Skype co-founder

This capital injection marks Loship as the first portfolio company of MetaPlanet in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

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Hanoi (VNS/VNA) – Loship, Vietnam’s fast-growing one-hour-delivery e-commerce startup, has announced its latest investment from Skype co-founder Jaan Tallinn.

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