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Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) to target Emerging markets

The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) will look more toward emerging markets next year, particularly Indonesia, Brazil and Argentina after seeing large potential in these countries.

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thai beach tourism TAT

The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) will look more toward emerging markets next year, particularly Indonesia, Brazil and Argentina after seeing large potential in these countries.

TAT governor Suraphon Svetasreni said emerging economies would expand more next year on the back of an expected slowdown in the European and US markets.

thai beach tourism TAT

"Tourists from Europe will travel less due to their economic problems and the stronger baht making trips here more costly for them," said TAT

Indonesia has 230 million people, the fourth most populous country after China, India and the US. Two million Indonesians visit Malaysia and Singapore each year.

via Bangkok Post : Emerging markets in spotlight next year.

The tourism body has appointed specialist travel and retail agency Fox Kalomaski to develop the digital strategy and also to work on traditional PR and press advertising.

The current TAT Facebook site will be made the “centre of a community and not just a corporate site”, according to Fox Kalomaski CEO Gary Jacobs.

Travellers will be encouraged to share their “fantastic stories and experiences” while being directed towards attractions such as the natural Naga Fireballs and the Songkran Thai water festival.

CEO of Fox Kalomaski says: “We believe Thailand is on a lot of people’s wish lists and it’s our job to pull the country forward and convince people that now is the time to go.”

There has been political unrest in the country in recent years with Bangkok airport forced to close in 2008 but Jacobs says: “I don’t think there is a perception problem at the moment. TAT works very hard to make sure tourism is not affected and the UK Foreign Office has never advised people to avoid the country.”

The country’s established tourism strapline is “Amazing Thailand always amazes you” and Jacobs says this is unlikely to be changed.

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