Myanmar is set to mark today, 22 October, the dawn of a new era in the history of FIFA’s health education projects, with the opening of the first-ever ‘FIFA 11 for Health’ programme in Asia.

Teachers and coaches from 18 pilot schools will gather in Yangon until Friday for training sessions supervised by FIFA’s Chief Medical Officer, Prof Jiri Dvorak. An additional three-day course on emergency medicine and anti-doping for member association doctors will begin on Wednesday.”It’s not a coincidence that Myanmar is the first Asian country in which we have implemented the ‘FIFA 11 for Health’ programme,” said Dvorak.

“Myanmar is a football country, and as such we are trying to use the power of our sport to tackle some concrete health issues. Both the Myanmar Football Federation and the country’s authorities have shown a consistent interest in our medical and health initiatives as they are convinced about the positive effect of football can have on health education and prevention.”

The ‘FIFA 11 for Health’ is an innovative programme that promotes 11 simple messages aimed at reducing communicable and non-communicable diseases. The initiative is based on an analysis of risk factors by the World Health OrganisationWHO.

via Myanmar hosts first health programme in Asia – FIFA.com.

About the author

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Get notified of our weekly selection of news

You May Also Like

PTTEP to take over Myanmar gas field operations after TotalEnergies exit

Asian energy companies’ continued presence in Myanmar is raising concerns that they could blunt the impact of new European Union sanctions on the country’s state oil and gas company.

Myanmar: 1.6 million jobs were lost in 2021 says ILO

Working hours are estimated to have decreased 18 per cent in 2021 relative to 2020, equivalent to the working time of at least 3.1 million full-time workers. These working-hour losses were driven by employment losses as well as increased underemployment.