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What Happens When We Run Out Of Oil?

While you and I may complain that gasoline costs too much and it’s not back down to the .19 cents a gallon that I paid as a high school kid, what will happen when gasoline reaches $10.00 per gallon and higher?

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China, closing in on the American Dream of a chicken in every pot and a car in every garage, today adds 16 million automobiles to its roads annually. They suffered a 60 mile traffic jam last fall, commonplace in Los Angeles and Chicago!

Source: Brian Williams at NBC New At China’s current rate by 2030, according to James Howard Kunstler, author of The Long Emergency, they expect to burn 98 million barrels of oil daily!

That’s one country with 1.3 billion people and adding 8.0 million net gain annually. They will burn more gasoline per day in the next 19 years, than the entire human race burns daily in 2011.

To display the dynamic of burning 84 million barrels of oil daily in 2011, let’s take an oil “drum” that holds 42 gallons. It measures 20 inches at the base. If you take 84 million of them and stood them side by side, they would create a “belt” around the world at the equator of 25,000 miles. We fill all 84 million of them with oil pumped from the ground and burn them down to nothing but “carbon footprint” every single day of the year. Source: Dr. John Tanton, www.thesocialcontract.com Check the carbon footprint damage at www.350.org for the accelerating environmental damage to our biosphere created from such a horrendous and continuous burn of fossil fuels.

While you and I may complain that gasoline costs too much and it’s not back down to the .19 cents a gallon that I paid as a high school kid, what will happen when gasoline reaches $10.00 per gallon and higher? Source: Chris Steiner’s book—$20 Per Gallon After that, what happens when it runs out?

via OfficialWire: What Happens When We Run Out Of Oil?.

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