Connect with us
The clever new way to send money abroad

China

China Gets New Chinese Domain Extensions Such as ‘.gossip’

Remember back when the internet was basically just .com and .org, and maybe a little .edu? Those were the days. There are now far more offerings for those little domain name endings, which are called gTLDs

Published

on

Remember back when the internet was basically just .com and .org, and maybe a little .edu? Those were the days. There are now far more offerings for those little domain name endings, which are called gTLDs (generic Top Level Domains), and ICANN has been adding new ones in other languages.

Anyone can apply, and then the domain extensions are considered and ultimately chosen (or not) by ICANN. The next batch of new ones, which will be rolled out over the next several years, is set to include a bunch of new Chinese domains, including:

  • .八卦 (.gossip)
  • .集团 (.group)
  • .网店 (.webstore)
  • .商城 (.mall)
  • .我爱你 (.iloveyou)
  • .娱乐 (.entertainment)
  • .慈善 (.charitable)
  • .时尚 (.fashion)
  • .网站 (.website)
  • .微博 (.weibo)

It will be a while before any of these are actually in use, and of course most companies will likely maintain their roman-letter URLs for some time even after adopting the Chinese language ones. But in the longer term, it will be interesting to see if this becomes yet another thing that separates China’s internet from the rest of the world.

At the same time, though, these Chinese-language domains are a fantastic step forward, as they will make the internet more accessible, especially to older generations who may not have the same familiarity with roman letters that many younger people do. If Chinese websites maintain both a Chinese and a roman-alphabet domain, that would be the best of both worlds for users both inside and outside China. Here’s hoping that’s what happens.

(China Business News via Sina Tech)

The post China Gets New Chinese Domain Extensions Such as ‘.iloveyou’ appeared first on Tech in Asia.

 

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Economics

China’s new three-child policy highlights risks of aging across emerging Asia

Thailand’s (Baa1 stable) total dependency ratio is set to jump nine percentage points to 51% by 2030 – a faster increase than China’s – which will pressure public and private savings through higher taxes and social spending, reducing innovation and productivity gains.

Published

on

Street vendor in Bangkok

Population aging in China (A1 stable) and other emerging markets in Asia will hurt economic growth, competitiveness and fiscal revenue, unless productivity gains accelerate, according to a new report by Moody’s Investors Service.

(more…)
Continue Reading

China

Clear skies over Asia’s new foreign investment landscape?

Published

on

Compounding the fallout of the US–China trade war, the global pandemic and recession have caused considerable speculation on the future of foreign investment and global value chains (GVCs). But though there is likely to be some permanent change, it will probably not be as great as politicians expect.

(more…)
Continue Reading

Most Read

Recent