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Durian Processing Factory opened in Southern Thailand

Durian has now become a very popular fruit among Chinese consumers, especially durian from southern border provinces known for a unique flavor.

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Durian Processing Factory opened in Southern Border Province

SONGKHLA, 09 July 2019 (NNT) – Durian is a very popular fruit in Thailand, and its export has become a major source of national income.

Durian production has interested many Chinese investors, with the third-largest durian processing factory in Thailand recently opened in a southern border province.

Durian has now become a very popular fruit among Chinese consumers, especially durian from southern border provinces known for a unique flavor.

Despite the high demand, only 5 percent of national durian harvest is exported to China.

Manguwang Food Company has realized the great potential of durian exports to the Chinese market, and has therefore made a significant investment, in cooperation with the Thai government which offers tax deductions and facilitation in opening the country’s third-largest durian processing factory.

Despite the high demand, only 5 percent of national durian harvest is exported to China.

With the new factory located in Songkhla province, the company buys fresh durian fruit from local farmers in southern border provinces and processes it using a freeze-dry process.

The product is then exported to provinces of China overland through Laos and Vietnam. The company is planning to include shipping by sea in the future. It is expected the company will purchase 12,000 tons of fresh durian fruit this year, and will increase the number to 20,000 tons in 2020, creating 1,200 new jobs for villagers.

Thepha District Chief, Sanong Chantarak said this week that the new durian factory will be very beneficial for local villagers and help increase local employment, as well as attracting other businesses to invest more in southern border provinces.

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