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GM sells Thai factory to Chinese automaker GWM

After 20 years of operation in Thailand, General Motors will cease its activities, and resell its factory to the Chinese manufacturer Great Wall Motors

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General Motors (GM) announced it will stop selling Chevrolet vehicles in Thailand and sell its Rayong plant to Great Wall Motors (GWM) by the end of this year.

GM entered Thailand in 2000 with a vehicle assembly plant with an annual production capacity of 180,000 units and a powertrain plant with an annual capacity of 120,000 units — with a combined investment of US$1.4 billion.

The Rayong plant has produced nearly 1.4 million vehicles since it opened in 2000.

China’s leading sport utility vehicle (SUV) and pickup maker Great Wall Motors on Monday said it will purchase General Motors’ Rayong car production facility in Thailand.

Based in the city of Baoding, in the Hebei province, in the north of China, the company Great Wall Motors owns several brands of SUVs and cars like Haval, Great Wall, WEY and ORA. With more than 500 branches abroad, its vehicles are exported to more than 60 countries.

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Economics

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China

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