Connect with us

Economics

Economic strategy and the roots of Thailand crisis

Avatar

Published

on

In his presentation at the 21 April 2010 ANU conference on “Thailand on the Verge,” Peter Warr highlighted the importance of inequality, especially rural-urban inequality, as a key factor underlying Thailand’s political turmoil. Inequality, along with a persistently high level of informality in the labor market, were first highlighted a couple of years ago by Pasuk Phongphaichit and Chris Baker.

Loading...

I want to push the causal arrows back a bit and address the roots of this inequality and informality, along with the country’s fall in absolute poverty noted by Warr.Thailand’s uneven performance — its overall poverty reduction and generally healthy growth rates, along with its persistent inequality and informality — are the result of a distinctive economic strategy.

The core of this strategy has been an emphasis on resource- and labor-intensive exports. In terms of policy, this has meant an emphasis on macroeconomic stability, logistics, and financial flows, especially to large firms. With brief and largely ineffective exceptions e.g. after the 1997 crisis, leaders have neglected the promotion of technical skills and linkages between small and medium-sized firms on the one hand, and larger producers on the other.

The result has been a form of uneven development. Thailand has been hugely successful at diversifying, at becoming a world player in sectors such as rubber, autos, and hard disk drives. But some 90% of Thai rubber is exported in largely unprocessed form, whereas the same percentage of Malaysia’s rubber is consumed domestically in locally produced manufactured goods. Thailand has been astute in encouraging automotive production for particular niches, especially pick-up trucks and more recently “eco-cars.” But the country’s impressive automotive “clusters” include only a small and dwindling number of local auto parts suppliers. Thai suppliers are even scarcer in disk drive production.

As the World Bank argued several years ago, Thailand’s ‘high-tech exports” are a misleading indicator of technological capacity; the country remains an assembler, rather than a manufacturer or designer.

via Economic strategy and the roots of Thai political turmoil.

Comments

Economics

The Future of Asia: greener but with a public and private debt hangover

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a perfect storm, destroying jobs, worsening poverty and inequality, and creating a public and private debt problem—especially for countries and firms already in fragile financial health beforehand

Avatar

Published

on

The Sydney Opera resumed live performances and the city of Melbourne recently hosted the Australian Open tennis tournament with fans (mostly) in attendance.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Economics

50:50 campaign may not get immediate extension

National News Bureau of Thailand

Published

on

logomain

Loading...

BANGKOK (NNT) – The government’s 50:50 co-pay campaign expiring on 31st March may not be getting an immediate campaign extension. The Minister of Finance says campaign evaluation is needed to improve future campaigns.

The Minister of Finance Arkhom Termpittayapaisith today announced the government may not be able to reach a conclusion on the extension of the 50:50 co-pay campaign in time for the current 31st March campaign end date, as evaluations are needed to better improve the campaign.

Originally introduced last year, the 50:50 campaign is a financial aid campaign for people impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, in which the government subsidizes up to half the price of purchases at participating stores, with a daily cap on the subsidy amount of 150 baht, and a 3,500 baht per person subsidy limit over the entire campaign.

The campaign has already been extended once, with the current end date set for 31st March.

The Finance Minister said that payout campaigns for the general public are still valid in this period, allowing time for the 50:50 campaign to be assessed, and to address reports of fraud at some participating stores.

The Fiscal Police Office Director General and the Ministry of Finance Spokesperson Kulaya Tantitemit, said today that a bigger quota could be offered in Phase 3 of the 50:50 campaign beyond the 15 million people enrolled in the first two phases, while existing participants will need to confirm their identity if they want to participate in Phase 3, without the need to fill out the registration form.

Mrs Kulaya said the campaign will still be funded by emergency loan credit allocated for pandemic compensation, which still has about 200 billion baht available as of today.

Source link

Continue Reading

Economics

Customs Department Considers Measures to Help SMEs

National News Bureau of Thailand

Published

on

logomain

BANGKOK (NNT) – The Customs Department is seeking ways to reduce the impact of the exemption on import tax and value-added tax (VAT) for imported goods worth up to 1,500 baht, as such measures are hurting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 13,958 other subscribers

Latest

Trending