Connect with us

Business

Troubled waters and fishy business

Today, consumers, distributors and even many seafood processors commonly lack basic information about the fisheries from which fish products originate. In general, they cannot know whether the fisheries are overfished or well-managed. They cannot even be assured that the fish were caught legally

Published

on

rtr2x6sh comp.32bd131b17d392233a0a60ed298961dd

Today, consumers, distributors and even many seafood processors commonly lack basic information about the fisheries from which fish products originate. In general, they cannot know whether the fisheries are overfished or well-managed. They cannot even be assured that the fish were caught legally – a major concern when current evidence suggests that illegal fishing could provide up to around 30% of the wild-caught seafood that reaches global markets and, ultimately, people’s plates.

Today, consumers, commonly lack basic information on fish sources

Today, consumers, distributors and even many seafood processors commonly lack basic information about the fisheries from which fish products originate

Overfishing cannot end without some fundamental changes in the fishing and seafood trade. Among the most important of these is to introduce traceability and transparency into seafood supply chains. Their absence is a fundamental obstacle to getting market signals in line with sustainability.

Such a system was introduced in 2009 by the International Commission for Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) for the Atlantic bluefin tuna – whose dwindling stocks and exorbitant price on fish markets have been highly publicized. The required government certification at each stage of the supply chain, from the oceans to consumers’ shopping carts, has dramatically improved compliance with ICCAT regulations. Before this measure, illegally produced tuna was easily confounded with legal products and almost no incentive existed for fishermen, fish farmers, traders or retailers to respect ICCAT rules. Perhaps most importantly, the measure raised consumer awareness around the issue of illegal fishing activity as well as its serious impact on the sustainability of tuna resources.

The story is not over yet – ICCAT is now working on the introduction of an electric, internet-based traceability system which will be both user-friendly and resource-efficient. Other relevant international organizations are also seriously considering the expansion of traceability of all tuna and other major species. This is an example of great success, not only for the conservation of marine species but also in transparent and accountable supply chain management.

via Seafood supply chains: no more fishy business | Forum:Blog | The World Economic Forum.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Economics

Stable outlook for APAC sovereigns as growth rebounds and debt stabilizes

Economic growth rates in Asia-Pacific are broadly rebounding and debt burdens stabilizing, giving rise to a stable outlook for sovereign creditworthiness in 2022. Still, the pace of recovery differs vastly, and some economies will experience deep economic scarring, according to a new report by Moody’s Investors Service.

Published

on

moodys flare

Economic growth rates in Asia-Pacific are broadly rebounding and debt burdens stabilizing, giving rise to a stable outlook for sovereign creditworthiness in 2022. Still, the pace of recovery differs vastly, and some economies will experience deep economic scarring, according to a new report by Moody’s Investors Service.

(more…)
Continue Reading

Business

China’s economy stumbles on power crunch

Published

on

Chinas economy stumbles on power crunch property woes

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s economy hit its slowest pace of growth in a year in the third quarter, hurt by power shortages, supply chain bottlenecks and major wobbles in the property market and raising pressure on policymakers to do more to prop up the faltering recovery.

(more…)
Continue Reading

Recent

Most Read

Join 14,209 other subscribers