Connect with us
intralinks

Environment

Flooding risk limited (Thailand’s Irrigation Dept)

There is no risk of a mega flood this year if the rainfall level is normal, according to a meteorological department forecast, while two major dams will not overflow, said a senior official of the Royal Irrigation Department.

Published

on

Thailand flooding

There is no risk of a mega flood this year if the rainfall level is normal, according to a meteorological department forecast, while two major dams will not overflow, said a senior official of the Royal Irrigation Department.

Mr Suthep Noipairoj, Deputy Director General of the Royal Irrigation Department, affirmed that the two major dams – the Bhumibol dam and the Sirikit dam – are capable of retaining more water and that reserve water is adequate for crop cultivation in the central region.

 

However, he conceded that low-lying areas in Ayutthaya and Ang Thong are likely to be submerged as is a normal occurrence every year.

Nevertheless, residential, commercial zones and industrial estates will be safe from flooding, he added.

via Irrigation Dept confident of no mega flood if rainfall normal.

The Thai government is inviting both Thai and foreign experts to help seek effective ways to deal with potential flood situations and handle water management in Thailand on a sustainable basis.

Loading...

The National Water Resources and Flood Policy Committee, chaired by Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, had approved the terms of reference of the project before the Prime Minister and Cabinet members began an inspection tour of eight provinces from 11 to 14 June 2012 to follow up on the progress of flood prevention measures.

The terms of reference were part of the Government’s comprehensive flood prevention plan to create a new and improved water and crisis management system.

The Minister of Science and Technology, Plodprasop Suraswadi, stated that, according to the terms of reference, consulting companies all over the world were invited to propose a conceptual plan on water management in Thailand. The invitation would be sent through various embassies, and bidding would open one month after the Cabinet approved the terms of reference on 12 June 2012. After that, three companies will be selected and allowed to work for three months.

Mr. Plodprasop said that the National Water Resources and Flood Policy Committee would spend one month on considering their performance before the next phases of working out detail designs and starting construction work. He pointed out that the project is meant to save Thailand from floods and drought and to increase the efficiency of water management in the country.

He said that, in principle, the proposed flood management plan must take into account His Majesty the King’s advice on water management. His Majesty has advocated a balance in both conservation and development and a holistic approach to water resource management, with measures to handle water from its origin as a droplet to the last drop released back into nature.

The plan, he said, must also respond to the master plan for water resources management approved earlier by the Strategic Committee for Water Resources Management. The master plan is aimed at improving the existing flood prevention system, building confidence in flood prevention in communities, agricultural areas, industrial sites, and important economic zones, and integrating the participation of stakeholders from all sectors for effective water management. It was drawn up after the flood crisis in Thailand in 2011 and involves short-term and long-term plans covering 25 river basins across the country.

Loading...

Corporate

The environmental case for remote working

Anyone searching for a silver lining to the pandemic should look to the clear, blue skies above them. A reduction in pollution worldwide has been an unintended benefit of the lockdowns and stay-in-place orders imposed to control the spread of COVID-19.

Published

on

During the pandemic, the environmental and societal benefits of working at home quickly became apparent. How can businesses protect these benefits in the future?

(more…)
Continue Reading

Environment

Asian cities most threatened by environmental risk

According to the first instalment of [email protected] series, which ranks the world’s 576 largest urban centres on their exposure to a range of environmental and climate-related threats, 99 of the world’s 100 riskiest cities are in Asia, including 37 in China and 43 in India.

Published

on

Companies operating and investing in Asian cities are going to face an increasingly stiff test to their resilience.

(more…)
Continue Reading
Wise

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14,090 other subscribers

Recent