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Why your air conditioner is making you cooler, and the world warmer

That refrigerator in the corner is doing more than extending the life of your fruits and vegetables: it’s also contributing to global warming

Aishwarya Gupta

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Cooling and refrigeration are essential to increasing labor productivity, improving educational outcomes, safeguarding food and minimizing its waste, improving healthcare, and supporting countries’ digital ambitions (that computer of yours heats up pretty fast).

And all of this, from improved productivity to education to health, is vital to eliminating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity across the globe.

And yet, it turns out that that refrigerator in the corner is doing more than extending the life of your fruits and vegetables: it’s also contributing to global warming. In a somewhat ironic twist, we know now that in filling the hole in the ozone layer over the past few decades under the aegis of the Montreal Protocol, we unwittingly had been adding to global warming.

The good news, though, is that we can act on this quickly, and the result (in ecological terms) is almost immediate. But if we continue as we have been, we could face big problems.

Undoubtedly, the Montreal Protocol’s success at reversing a universal environmental problem, depletion of the earth’s ozone layer, also helped in our fight against climate change. Without the Montreal Protocol agreement and its 25 years of action to stop production and human consumption of harmful chemicals, the climate challenge facing the world today would be far worse.

Overall, the climate achievements in phasing out chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) an organic compound made exclusively of chlorine, fluorine, and carbon, have been equated to the equivalent of eight billion tons a year of CO2.

 

Source: Your air conditioner is making you cooler, and the world warmer. We can change that. | Development in a Changing Climate

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Environment

Thailand to put world’s largest floating solar farm into use this June

The facility, which generates power on a water surface of 72 hectares, was originally scheduled for operation in December last year, but the launch was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Bangkok (VNA) – State-run Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat) expects to operate a 45-megawatt floating solar farm it claims to be the largest in the world this June.

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Environment

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There is an increasing awareness of the environmental impact of real estate: the World Green Building Council suggests that buildings are responsible for upwards of 40% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Daniel Lorenzzo

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Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the real estate sector worldwide is stepping up its response to climate change and sustainable development.

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Environment

Thailand accepts World Bank’s climate change grant

Thailand has approved an acceptance draft for a 5 million dollar grant from the World Bank, to fund projects reducing the emission of environmentally harmful HFC gas.

National News Bureau of Thailand

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BANGKOK (NNT) – In addition to several projects and agreements approved in the Cabinet meeting yesterday, the government has agreed to accept a 5 million dollar U.S. grant from the World Bank to reduce emissions of hydrofluorocarbon gas (HFC), which is one of the greenhouse gases affecting the globe’s ozone layer.

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