Connect with us

Business

Bangkok still at early stage of smart city according to Nokia study

Bangkok is classified as a megacity that can leverage technology, particularly the Internet of Things (IoT), to manage city services in a more efficient and smarter way

Published

on

Bangkok has been classified as having moderate development potential for an innovation-driven smart city among top global cities, according to a study released by Nokia.

The Finnish telecom equipment maker analysed 22 cities that are paving the way in smart city investment.

The “Smart City Playbook” study was commissioned by Nokia and conducted by Machina Research.

“Bangkok is still at the beta stage in the drive towards a smarter city,” said Harald Preiss, head of North Asia for Nokia.

Bangkok’s development pace is on par with that of China’s Wuxi, but lags behind advanced cities like San Francisco and New York.

It is expected that 66 percent of the world’s population will live in urban centers by 2050, making it critical for governments and other stakeholders to put strategies in place to more effectively meet the needs of their growing populations.

Intelligent ICT and IoT platforms have essential roles to play in the evolution of smart cities.

The study concluded that many cities are already leveraging these technologies to optimize services and infrastructure, make better-informed decisions, boost economic development, encourage social interactions and make their communities safer and eco-friendly while improving the delivery of a range of public services.

Mr Preiss said Bangkok is classified as a megacity that can leverage technology, particularly the Internet of Things (IoT), to manage city services in a more efficient and smarter way as well as ensure public safety while enhancing sustainability.

Bangkok has rolled out public WiFi, environmental monitoring systems using sensors detecting air and water pollution, close-circuit television and mobile surveillance monitoring systems to improve security as well as intelligent transportation systems.

Mr Preiss said Bangkok can leverage more advanced technologies through the use of data analytics, augmented reality, the IoT and intelligent systems to further enhance efficiency.

“Bangkok has high potential to exercise full-scale implementation plans for public safety and traffic management — the key priorities for cooperation in the digital economy,” he said.

The study uncovered significant diversity in the smart city strategies of different cities, but identified three distinct ‘routes’ that cities are taking to make themselves smarter. The ‘anchor’ route involves a city deploying a single application to address a pressing problem such as traffic congestion, and then adding other applications over time.

The ‘platform’ route involves building the underlying infrastructure needed to support a wide variety of smart applications and services.

‘Beta Cities’, by contrast, try out multiple applications as pilots to see how they perform before making long-term deployment decisions.

While the study found significant differences between cities, even amongst those cities following the same route, it also concluded that there are several particular practices used by successful smart cities that would appear to be of universal benefit, including:

  • Successful cities have established open and transparent rules for the use of data (on which all smart cities are dependent) by government departments and third parties, whether shared freely or monetized to cover data management costs.
  • Many cities that are advanced in their smart city journeys have committed to making both information and communications technology (ICT) and IoT infrastructure accessible to users both inside and outside of government, and have avoided the creation of ‘silos’ between government departments.
  • Governments (and their third-party partners) that have worked to actively engage residents in smart city initiatives have been particularly effective, most notably those where the benefits are highly visible such as smart lighting and smart parking.
  • Smart city infrastructure needs to be scalable so it can grow and evolve to meet future needs, and secure to provide certainty that both government and private data are protected.
  • Cities that select technology partners that can provide the innovation capacity, ability to invest and real-world experience, along with technology platforms that are open to avoid vendor lock-in, will be at an advantage.

The study also offers myriad, real-world examples of how various cities are managing challenges including those identified above.

* Note: Cities profiled in the study include Auckland, Bangkok, Barcelona, Berlin, Bogota, Bristol, Cape Town, Cleveland, Delhi, Dubai, Jeddah, Mexico City, New York City, Paris, Pune, San Francisco, São Paulo, Shanghai, Singapore, Tokyo, Vienna and Wuxi

For city-by-city findings and the complete set of smart city best practices and recommendations, read the full Machina Research Smart City Playbook at nokia.ly/smartcityplaybook

Comments

Business

Thailand ranked 3rd in ASEAN on Economic Freedom Index

Thailand has a business freedom index of 85.3 out of 100. This is a big improvement over last year, which helped to increase the country’s overall score to 69.7, a 0.3 point jump from last year.

Published

on

Thailand ranked 3rd in ASEAN, 9th among 40 Asia-pacific countries and 42nd in the World on the most recent on Economic Freedom index. Singapore tops the list for the second consecutive year, followed by New Zealand and Australia.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Business

Why Thai Firms Should Care About the Career Stage of China’s Officials

In Chinese bureaucracy, large-scale leadership turnover happens every five years, right on the heels of the Party’s National Congress: think of it as a window of opportunity for promotions, but with a few constraints

Published

on

Governments typically set a wide range of goals. This is reasonable and expected: For a society to grow sustainably, social stability-related targets are just as critical as economic ones.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Business

Marijuana could generate up to Bt8 billion for Thailand’s pharmaceutical industry

Last year, Thailand removed cannabis and hemp leaves from its list of banned narcotics (seeds and buds remain banned).

Published

on

Marijuana could generate up to Bt8 billion for Thailand’s pharmaceutical industry over the next five years, but farmers stand to make little from growing the herb, experts say.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Latest

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 13,634 other subscribers

Trending