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Thailand’s ministry of Public Health on food alert

Thailand’s ministries of Public Health and Natural Resources and Environment will closely monitor and inspect food imported from Japan and Thailand’s air quality to check radiation levels but downplayed any direct and immediate threat to the country following explosions in Japanese nuclear power plants in Fukushima.

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Thailand’s ministries of Public Health and Natural Resources and Environment will closely monitor and inspect food imported from Japan and Thailand’s air quality to check radiation levels but downplayed any direct and immediate threat to the country following explosions in Japanese nuclear power plants in Fukushima.

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The crisis at the Fukushima No 1 plant has now spread to four of its six reactors following Friday’s quake and tsunami which knocked out the plant’s cooling systems. The Japanese government said that radiation levels near a quake-hit nuclear plant are now harmful to human health after two explosions and a fire at the crippled facility today.

 

 

Permanent Secretary for Public Health Paijit Varachit urged the Thai public not to be alarmed, as the ministry has prepared pre-cautionary measures to assure that Thais will remain safe from any possible effects of the nuclear crisis in Japan and to remain confident regarding the Japanese government, considered one of the countries with effective safety measures to protect the health of its public.

He said that there is a possibility that radiation from Japan could be carried to Thailand by radiation-exposed food products and the atmosphere.

via Ministry of Public Health on high alert screen food imports from Japan.

The Office of Atoms for Peace which oversees the use of nuclear technology in the country has played down fears radioactive leakage at a nuclear power plant in Japan may spread to Thailand.

“We have closely monitored the situation of the nuclear power plant explosion in Japan since Saturday,” OAP secretary-general Chaiwat Toskulkao said yesterday.

“From the wind direction, radioactive dust has been swept towards the northeastern direction. The dust, if there is any, will not reach Thailand. So I would say we are quite safe.”

Thailand is more than 4,300 kilometres from Japan.

Thailand has eight radioactive monitoring stations. None has detected any radiation, said Siriratana Biramontri, director of Bureau of Technical Support for Nuclear Safety.

 

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National News Bureau of Thailand

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BANGKOK (NNT) – AstraZeneca has approved safety standards at Thailand’s vaccine factory and will send the first batch of raw materials for vaccine production in June.

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Skin-lightening products market to reach US$31 billion by 2024

In emerging Asian and African economies, the natural aspiration to enhance one’s circumstances has led to rapid growth in the market for skin-lightening products, which is projected to reach US$31 billion by 2024.

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Recent years have seen evolving awareness of systemic inequities including racism, sexism and pro-Western chauvinism.

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Has Covid-19 prompted the Belt and Road Initiative to go green?

Oxford Business Group

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Has Covid-19 prompted the Belt and Road Initiative to go green?
– Covid-19 led to a slowdown in BRI projects
– Chinese overseas investment dropped off in 2020
– Government remains committed to the wide-ranging infrastructure programme
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Following a year of coronavirus-related disruptions, China appears to be placing a greater focus on sustainable, digital and health-related projects in its flagship Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).

As OBG outlined in April last year, the onset of Covid-19 prompted questions about the future direction of the BRI.

Launched in 2013, the BRI is an ambitious international initiative that aims to revive ancient Silk Road trade routes through large-scale infrastructure development.

By the start of 2020 some 2951 BRI-linked projects – valued at a total of $3.9trn – were planned or under way across the world.

However, as borders closed and lockdowns were imposed, progress stalled on a number of major BRI infrastructure developments.

In June China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced that 30-40% of BRI projects had been affected by the virus, while a further 20% had been “seriously affected”. Restrictions on the flow of Chinese workers and construction supplies were cited as factors behind project suspensions or slowdowns in Pakistan, Cambodia and Indonesia, among other countries.

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