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Sayonara

One year to the day after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami I am signing off on the Japan blog. The disaster-in-installments that was kicked off by the March 11 quake, the largest in Japanese history, was a primary focus of this blog, and Japan’s reaction shed light onto characteristics of Japanese society. The purpose of my blog as stated in my first post was to “make sense of Japan for a Western audience.” The international-headline news that came out from Japan this past year gave me many opportunities to explore themes in Japanese society and discuss the issues facing contemporary Japan. I learned a lot about Japan over the past year and got to exchange e-mails with lots of readers. I thank all of my readers for the lively correspondence and valuable insights. I also want to thank my senior blogger, Faheem Haider, and FPA editor/producer Robert Nolan for their guidance over the past year. I realize I was quite critical of Japan over the past year. It is hard to write about the issues without becoming cynical at times. I could have written, “Everything is sunny and peachy here in Okayama,” but that would not have made for a very interesting (or long) blog. So I’d like to end on a more upbeat note. Japan is a fascinating and wonderful country. The Japanese have a rich cultural heritage. Whether you travel to Japan to see historical sights, climb Mt. Fuji, partake in the unique and special culinary arts, visit a hot spring, or simply wander the resplendent streets of Tokyo, there is plenty to love about Japan. And while I found some elements of Japanese culture baffling, and I was occasionally frustrated with the bone-headed rhetoric of Tokyo’s politicians, I find the Japanese to be generally decent people, who are kind by nature and have an off-beat sense of humor, and every bit as good as Americans. The only thing left to say is sayonara and thanks for reading!

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One year to the day after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami I am signing off on the Japan blog. The disaster-in-installments that was kicked off by the March 11 quake, the largest in Japanese history, was a primary focus of this blog, and Japan’s reaction shed light onto characteristics of Japanese society. The purpose of my blog as stated in my first post was to “make sense of Japan for a Western audience.” The international-headline news that came out from Japan this past year gave me many opportunities to explore themes in Japanese society and discuss the issues facing contemporary Japan. I learned a lot about Japan over the past year and got to exchange e-mails with lots of readers. I thank all of my readers for the lively correspondence and valuable insights. I also want to thank my senior blogger, Faheem Haider, and FPA editor/producer Robert Nolan for their guidance over the past year. I realize I was quite critical of Japan over the past year. It is hard to write about the issues without becoming cynical at times. I could have written, “Everything is sunny and peachy here in Okayama,” but that would not have made for a very interesting (or long) blog. So I’d like to end on a more upbeat note. Japan is a fascinating and wonderful country. The Japanese have a rich cultural heritage. Whether you travel to Japan to see historical sights, climb Mt. Fuji, partake in the unique and special culinary arts, visit a hot spring, or simply wander the resplendent streets of Tokyo, there is plenty to love about Japan. And while I found some elements of Japanese culture baffling, and I was occasionally frustrated with the bone-headed rhetoric of Tokyo’s politicians, I find the Japanese to be generally decent people, who are kind by nature and have an off-beat sense of humor, and every bit as good as Americans. The only thing left to say is sayonara and thanks for reading!

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Sayonara

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Tourism

The Bachelor Japan Season 4 showcases Thailand

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Bangkok, 2 December, 2021 – The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) is pleased to report that Thailand features as the main location in the Japanese reality TV show ‘The Bachelor Japan Season 4’, of which the first episode aired on 25 November, 2021.

In cooperation with the TAT Tokyo Office, a film crew from Amazon Prime Japan and YD Creation Japan comprising 65 actors, production staff, technicians and others travelled to Thailand to shoot for the show in the spectacular Southern provinces of Phuket, Phang-Nga, and Krabi between April and June 2021.

A total of six out of the 10 60-minute episodes of ‘The Bachelor Japan Season 4’ were filmed in Thailand.

 Aside from the valuable promotional exposure the destination will receive in Japan, a key source market for visitors from the Asian region, the foreign production also generated much-needed income and employment opportunities in the local tourism and film-related sectors of the three chosen locations.

Phuket, Phang-Nga’ and Krabi were among the first destinations in Thailand to reopen to tourism under the Sandbox programme, and the TAT Tokyo Office has capitalised on the interest of foreign filmmaking to promote the world-class tourist appeal and public health safety standards of these destinations.

Mr. Yuthasak Supasorn, TAT Governor, said “Popular TV shows like ‘The Bachelor’ are an effective way to deliver promotional messages directly to international markets, in this case Japan, which is among the 63 countries and territories from which fully vaccinated visitors can enter Thailand through the Exemption from Quarantine (TEST & GO) programme. With Thailand featuring so significantly in ‘The Bachelor Japan Season 4’, this helps us to promote travel to Thailand now that entry rules are being relaxed and tourists are once again welcomed.”

Fully vaccinated visitors from every country around the world can also visit Thailand via the Living in the “Blue Zone” Sandbox destinations programme. Meanwhile, partially or unvaccinated visitors are also much welcomed via the Happy Quarantine programme. However, to prevent and control the spread of the new Omicron COVID-19 variant, Thailand currently imposes travel restrictions on arrivals from Africa.

Photo Credit: Instagram: @BachelorJapan外部リンク, @bachelorjap外部リンク

The post The Bachelor Japan Season 4 showcases Thailand appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Asean

ASEAN commemorates Youth in Climate Action and Disaster Resilience Day 2021

An intergenerational dialogue titled ‘Teaming up with You(th) for a Disaster-Resilient and Climate-Friendly ASEAN’, was moderated by the ASEAN Youth Forum’s Programme Manager, Rastra Yasland.

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JAKARTA, 30 November 2021 – The ASEAN Secretariat hosted an interactive webinar to commemorate ASEAN Youth in Climate Action and Disaster Resilience Day on 25 November.

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