Connect with us

Southeast Asia not ready to go nuclear

Author: Sahara Piang Brahim, NUS Southeast Asia is experiencing sustained economic growth and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. A recent OECD forecast shows that the region is expected to achieve an annual average growth rate of 5.5 per cent from 2013 to 2017. With economic growth comes the need to meet growing energy demands, and to address this challenge regional countries are showing an interest in nuclear development — but Southeast Asia has a long way to go yet before nuclear power can be considered a safe and viable option. Energy security is one of the biggest challenges confronting the countries in Southeast Asia as they continue to depend on energy imports to meet most of their energy needs. In terms of nuclear plans and nuclear development, Vietnam is at the forefront, with a government announcement in February 2006 that a 2000 MWe nuclear power plant will be on line by 2020.

Boris Sullivan

Published

on

Southeast Asia is experiencing sustained economic growth and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. A recent OECD forecast shows that the region is expected to achieve an annual average growth rate of 5.5 per cent from 2013 to 2017.

With economic growth comes the need to meet growing energy demands, and to address this challenge regional countries are showing an interest in nuclear development — but Southeast Asia has a long way to go yet before nuclear power can be considered a safe and viable option. Energy security is one of the biggest challenges confronting the countries in Southeast Asia as they continue to depend on energy imports to meet most of their energy needs.

In terms of nuclear plans and nuclear development, Vietnam is at the forefront, with a government announcement in February 2006 that a 2000 MWe nuclear power plant will be on line by 2020.

Thus, despite the Fukushima accident, some Southeast Asian governments remain determined to embark on a nuclear path, mainly due to concerns about climate change and sustainability, security of energy supply and energy mix diversification, and volatile fossil fuel prices. However, like any other newcomer to the nuclear energy field, Southeast Asian governments should deal with a number of issues relevant to the implementation of their first nuclear power programs. As the majority of the countries in the region are prone to natural calamities, site selection is of utmost importance. The prevalence of natural disasters in the region is among the main arguments of those opposing nuclear development. The Philippines is a classic example. The country’s BNPP was not launched because of safety concerns as the plant was built near major earthquake fault lines and close to the then highly active Mount Pinatubo volcano.

Author: Sahara Piang Brahim, NUS

Read more here:
Southeast Asia not ready to go nuclear

Comments

Economics

Thai economy to grow 4% in 2021 following 6.5% decline in 2020

The World Bank is now expecting the Thai economy to see 4% growth this year, and a 4.7% growth in 2022, despite current challenges from the new wave of COVID-19 infections.

Olivier Languepin

Published

on

Crowded downtown area in Bangkok

The World Bank now expects that the Thai economy to expand by 4 per cent in 2021, according to the latest World Bank Thailand Economic Monitor report “Restoring Incomes, Recovering Jobs” released on Wednesday (Jan 20).

(more…)
Continue Reading

News

Thailand new coronavirus cases -59- down to two digits

Of the new cases, 28 were exposed to the virus while visiting high-risk areas. The province with the highest number of infections is Bangkok (10), followed by Samut Sakhon (7).

Boris Sullivan

Published

on

Thailand confirmed 59 new coronavirus cases and one additional death on Wednesday, taking its total infections to 12,653 and fatalities to 71, the first day Covid infections are down to two digits since the beginning of the second Covid-19 outbreak in the country in December.

(more…)
Continue Reading

Banking

APAC corporates likely to improve in 2021

Moody’s Investors Service says in a new report that credit conditions in APAC will improve in 2021, supported by the gradual recovery of economic activity given the early containment of the pandemic in several Asian economies.

Pr News

Published

on

By

Ongoing fiscal and monetary support in both advanced and emerging markets will also aid improving conditions, but renewed lockdowns in parts of the world have stalled the nascent global economic recovery and create uncertainty around improving credit conditions.

(more…)
Continue Reading

Latest

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 13,605 other subscribers

Trending