Connect with us

Headline

Bangkok office rent still among World’s Cheapest

Boris Sullivan

Published

on

According to CBRE study, Bangkok rank 151 st among 179 countries with an occupancy cost of 694 Baht per square meter. Djakarta has the lowest cost in Asia with a 481 baht per square meter. London’s West End can once again lay claim to the distinction of being the world’s most expensive office market after its rental prices surged past those in the inner central district in Tokyo.

Office markets worldwide are experiencing unprecedented declines in prime office rents. The year-over-year change in the prime office occupancy costs  of the 179 markets CBRE Global Research and Consulting monitors for this publication revealed a collective drop of 7.7% worldwide. The majority of markets—a total of 131—experienced an annual decline, while nearly 50  markets registered double-digit percentage-point drops in office occupancy  costs, year-over-year.

Many of the world’s important financial centers are seeing unprecedented  declines and are at the top of the list of fastest-changing markets. These include Hong Kong Central CBD (-40.7%) and New York’s Midtown Manhattan (-29.7%), along with some emerging markets such as Ho Chi Minh City (-45.4%) and Abu Dhabi (-38.6%) , both of which until recently had been amongst the fastest growing markets.   Kiev, Ukraine, led the world with the largest year-over-year decrease in office  occupancy costs, falling 64.6%.

Hong Kong office rent experienced one of the sharpest drop (-40%)

Hong Kong office rent experienced one of the sharpest drop (-40%)

London’s West End can once again lay claim to the dubious distinction of being the world’s most expensive office market after its rental prices surged past those in the inner central district in Tokyo.

Office rents in the West End rose over the six months to Sept. 30 as most global markets reported a decline, according to new research from property advisers CB Richard Ellis.

Offices in the West End were charging an average of $184.85 per square foot per year at the end of September, up from $172.62 in March. Offices in Tokyo’s inner central district, which was the second most expensive place to rent, cost an average of $171.64 per square foot. The third most costly rental location was Tokyo’s outer central district, where a square foot of office space cost $139.09.

Hong Kong’s central business district and Moscow rank fourth and fifth in the report, which tracks office occupancy costs in 179 cities around the world. New York’s Midtown office district ranked 24th, at $68.93 a square foot.

Asia’s economic performance generally exceeded expectations in 3Q 2009, with key data indicating the region is experiencing a mild recovery on the heels of sustained growth in China and India. Consumer and business sentiment continued to improve, a trend reflected by the revival of  the capital markets and the rebound of asset prices in a number of key markets. Economists became more optimistic on the regional economy and lifted Asia’s growth outlook, with the IMF revising its 2009 and 2010 GDP growth forecast for Asia upwards, to 2.8% and 5.8%, respectively. However, a number of export-oriented countries remained vulnerable to the still-fragile export sector and weakened industrial production. The Asian office leasing market gradually picked up during 3Q with a rise in inquiries from corporate office occupiers after a quiet first half. It is expected that a significant portion of this interest will translate into signed  leases in late 2009 and into 2010. Existing occupiers continued to seek  out lower costs and better-value relocation options. Prime office rents in  major markets generally remained stuck in the down cycle, although rents began to fall at a much slower rate compared to that of 1H 2009.

Here is a list of the top 10 most expensive office districts worldwide, with other selected markets as well.
1. London (West End)
2. Tokyo (Inner Central)
3. Tokyo (Outer Central)
4. Hong Kong (Central Business District)
5. Moscow
6. Paris
7. Mumbai
8. Dubai
9. London (City)
10. New Delhi (CBD)
12. Rio de Janeiro
18. Geneva
24. New York City (Midtown)
25. Rome
50. Washington (CBD)
Source: CB Richard Ellis

Continue Reading
Advertisement Load WordPress Sites in as fast as 37ms!
Comments

China

Chinese vote 14 Thai tourism favourites

The 2017 People’s Choice Awards Thailand were based on 3.7 million votes cast during a two-week period.

Avatar

Published

on

Tourism Authority of Thailand announced, Tuesday, the top 14 tourist attractions and activities for Chinese tourists visiting Thailand. (more…)

Continue Reading

Banking

Thai baht hits new record high in two years

The Thai baht is one of the best-performing currencies in the region this year, rising about 5% against the dollar.

Olivier Languepin

Published

on

The Thai baht rose to 33.94 baht per USD, a record high in the past two years after the Bank of Thailand (BOT) decided not to take measures to stop the rise of the domestic currency. (more…)

Continue Reading

Education

We’ll Live to 100, but Can We Afford It?

As the quality of healthcare has increased during the past century, so too have global life expectancies – but new generations will pay a high price for living longer.

Avatar

Published

on

The world’s six largest pension systems will have a joint shortfall of $224 trillion by 2050, imperiling the incomes of future generations and setting the industrialized world up for the biggest pension crisis in history. (more…)

Continue Reading

Most Read

Upcoming Events

Tue 22

34th International Conference on Dental and Oral Health

October 21 @ 9:00 am - October 22 @ 5:00 pm BMT
Nov 06

2nd World Congress on Pediatrics and Child care

November 6 @ 8:00 am - November 7 @ 7:00 pm BMT
Radisson Hotel Narita
Tomisato-shi
Nov 07

3rd World Congress On Gynecology, Obstetrics & Reproductive Health

November 7 @ 9:00 am - November 8 @ 4:00 pm BMT

Press Release

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 11,595 other subscribers

Trending