Connect with us

Opinion

The Other Women’s Movement: Factory Workers in the Developing World

Factory jobs give millions of women what they can’t get anywhere else: a salaried wage. With it, they can begin to exert control over their future. Factory work isn’t just about making clothes; it’s also about a potential path toward gender equality.

Avatar

Published

on

As the Rana Plaza tragedy in Bangladesh makes all too clear, the factory jobs in our global supply chain carry significant risks for the millions of people who fill them — the majority of whom are women under the age of 30.

Loading...
Factory jobs give millions of women what they can't get anywhere else

Factory jobs give millions of women what they can’t get anywhere else: a salaried wage. With it, they can begin to exert control over their future. Factory work isn’t just about making clothes; it’s also about a potential path toward gender equality.

Their work lives consist of sitting and standing in dense lines for up to 12 hours a day (sometimes more), cutting fabric, sewing garment pieces together, placing buttons and collars, printing T-shirt designs, and cleaning stray threads. And they often find themselves vulnerable during their commutes, experiencing verbal and physical harassment from men.

Despite the risks, women actually want to work, and they understand that it comes with significant dangers. In February, for example, I met a 31-year-old woman in Bangladesh who told me she came to Dhaka with her husband (whom she married at 15) to create a better future for their family.

He now works in Bahrain in the construction sector, and she uses her factory wages to care for their two daughters. She was clearly proud that her work provided for her children and her independence allowed her to make better choices for them. “I will keep my daughter in school as long as she wants,” she told me. “And I won’t marry her off like my mother did me.”

Factory jobs give millions of women what they can’t get anywhere else: a salaried wage. With it, they can begin to exert control over their future. Factory work isn’t just about making clothes; it’s also about a potential path toward gender equality.

via The Other Women’s Movement: Factory Workers in the Developing World – Rachael Meiers – Harvard Business Review.

Comments

Opinion

The Clubhouse challenge to digital authoritarianism in Thailand

Launched in 2020, Clubhouse is an audio-based social media platform which allows users to create groups and share stories. Each member can schedule and host a virtual room, and then decide who can speak.

Avatar

Published

on

Disputes between the Thai authorities and anti-authoritarian movements are moving from the streets to the online world. Thai protestors are using creative memes and hashtags to spread their agenda.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Opinion

Biden recalibrates Trump’s approach to East Asia

Donald Trump seriously degraded the United States’ role in the region, helping Beijing to escalate the most hostile and confrontational US–China relationship in 50 years.

Avatar

Published

on

President Joe Biden has much repair and restoration work to do in East Asia. Donald Trump seriously degraded the United States’ role in the region, helping Beijing to escalate the most hostile and confrontational US–China relationship in 50 years.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Opinion

‘Guillotine’ regulations to lift Thai economy

At the moment the government has already injected 1.9 trillion baht into the system, of which the loan amount accounts for 1 trillion baht.

Avatar

Published

on

The second wave of Covid-19 in Thailand has proved to be challenging to our economic team.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14,066 other subscribers

Latest

Trending