Thailand’s Centre for COVID-19 Situation Administration (CCSA) decided to extend the country’s State of Emergency until January 31st and to remove the COVID-19 “dark red” zone status, spokesman Dr. Taweesin Visanuyothin told the media after the CCSA meeting.

Thailand’s night-time curfew will end from Dec 1 as government lays out reopening plans.

Fully inoculated people, arriving in Thailand under the “sandbox” scheme, will be required to stay within the initial province for five days, effective from December 16th.

Foreign arrivals, under the “Test and Go” and “sandbox” programmes which are quarantine-exempted schemes will only be required to take rapid antigen tests, instead of RT-PCR tests which take longer, also from December 16th.

The CCSA has also reduced the number of “red” provinces, from 39 to 23, which includes Khon Kaen, Chanthaburi, Chumphon, Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, Trang, Trat, Tak, Nakhon Ratchasima, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Narathiwat, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Prachin Buri, Pattani, Ayutthaya, Phatthalung, Yala, Rayong, Songkhla, Satun, Saraburi, Sa Kaeo and Surat Thani.

Kanchanaburi, Pathum Thani and Nonthaburi have been added to the existing “sandbox” provinces, which include Bangkok, Krabi, Phang-nga, Phuket.

Specific areas in 19 provinces including Chon Buri have also been classified as “sandboxes” or as tourism pilot programmes.

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