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News.me: an iPhone built social network for news

News.me is a service from the New York-based innovation lab betaworks that filters users’ Twitter and Facebook streams to deliver them the most interesting stories they might have missed. It started out on the iPad only, but today it is launching on the iPhone with some new features. The company gained strong traction recently after social news-aggregator Summify was purchased by Twitter and shut down, and News.me received ten-times the normal amount of daily sign-ups. News.me general manager Jake Levine hopes moving to the iPhone, which has roughly 100-times the users of the iPad, will add another boost. “We’re very focused on building a social network for news from the ground up, and the iPhone is a natural part of that ecosystem.” In designing for the iPhone, News.me made a few changes. The tablet version is a lean-back experience that users spend a lot of time with. The iPhone is meant for quick consumption and response. To that end, News.me has added a series of one tap “reactions.” When reading a story, users can see reactions from their social networks, and with a single tap, add their own response: Ha!, Sad, Awesome, Really?, and Wow. The model is similar to like the reactions people can record on Buzzfeed or Canvas, the idea being that lightweight, pre-packaged responses help more people to engage and give the news item a certain viral lift. Plus, says Levine, if people begin to use them a lot, News.me will have a powerful set of structured data it can play with to help show what stories inspired the most anger, confusion, or joy. “We look at what Instagram and Foursquare have been able to accomplish, building a new social network around photos and location,” said Levine. “We think news is another high-value category where people want to be able to build a very specific network that has a high signal-to-noise ratio.” Interestingly, with all the hard work people are putting into innovative services for news consumption, email is still the most popular way to share articles (News.me has a daily email digest as well). You can download the News.me iPhone app here. Filed under: media, mobile

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News.me is a service from the New York-based innovation lab betaworks that filters users’ Twitter and Facebook streams to deliver them the most interesting stories they might have missed. It started out on the iPad only, but today it is launching on the iPhone with some new features.

The company gained strong traction recently after social news-aggregator Summify was purchased by Twitter and shut down, and News.me received ten-times the normal amount of daily sign-ups. News.me general manager Jake Levine hopes moving to the iPhone, which has roughly 100-times the users of the iPad, will add another boost.

“We’re very focused on building a social network for news from the ground up, and the iPhone is a natural part of that ecosystem.”

In designing for the iPhone, News.me made a few changes. The tablet version is a lean-back experience that users spend a lot of time with. The iPhone is meant for quick consumption and response. To that end, News.me has added a series of one tap “reactions.” When reading a story, users can see reactions from their social networks, and with a single tap, add their own response: Ha!, Sad, Awesome, Really?, and Wow.

The model is similar to like the reactions people can record on Buzzfeed or Canvas, the idea being that lightweight, pre-packaged responses help more people to engage and give the news item a certain viral lift. Plus, says Levine, if people begin to use them a lot, News.me will have a powerful set of structured data it can play with to help show what stories inspired the most anger, confusion, or joy. “We look at what Instagram and Foursquare have been able to accomplish, building a new social network around photos and location,” said Levine. “

See the article here –

News.me hits the iPhone and builds out a social network for news

Myanmar

Digital Revolution and Repression in Myanmar and Thailand

Activists have also proactively published social media content in multiple languages using the hashtags #WhatsHappeningInMyanmar and #WhatsHappeningInThailand to boost coverage of events on the ground.

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By Karen Lee

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Following the February 1 coup, Myanmar’s netizens became the latest to join the #MilkTeaAlliance, an online collective of pro-democracy youth across Asia.

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Ecommerce

How will oil prices shape the Covid-19 recovery in emerging markets?

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How will oil prices shape the Covid-19 recovery in emerging markets?
– After falling significantly in 2020, oil prices have returned to pre-pandemic levels
– The rise has been driven by OPEC+ production cuts and an improving economic climate
– Higher prices are likely to support a rebound in oil-producing emerging markets
– Further virus outbreaks or increased production would pose challenges to price stability

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A combination of continued production cuts and an increase in economic activity has prompted oil prices to return to pre-pandemic levels – a factor that will be crucial to the recovery of major oil-producing countries in the Middle East and Africa.

Brent crude prices rose above $60 a barrel in early February, the first time they had exceeded pre-Covid-19 values. They have since continued to rise, going above $66 a barrel on February 24.

The ongoing increase in oil prices, which have soared by 75% since November and around 26% since the beginning of the year, marks a dramatic change from last year.

Following the closure of many national borders and the implementation of travel-related restrictions to stop the spread of the virus, demand for oil slumped globally.

In the wake of the Saudi-Russia price war in early 2020, Brent crude prices fell from around $60 a barrel in February that year to two-decade lows of $20 a barrel in late April, as supply increased and demand plummeted. The value of WTI crude – the main benchmark for oil in the US – fell to record lows of around $40 a barrel last year on the back of a lack of storage space.

While global demand for oil remains low, one factor credited with reversing the trend is the decision to make significant cuts to oil production, which subsequently tightened global supplies.

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Tech

How the Rural-Urban Divide Plays Out on Digital Platforms

It is one thing for entrepreneurs, whether urban or rural, to create and operate an online store, as some digital platforms have made it relatively easy to manage an e-store – even by using just a smartphone.

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In the West, villages are emptying out due to the lack of economic opportunities. Consider Italy where, in a bid to attract newcomers, a handful of municipalities have turned to selling houses for €1.

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