Connect with us

Tech

iPhone 5 rumors will be a snoozefest this year

Now that the new iPad is out, the tech world is beginning to anxiously report on details about Apple’s next iPhone (let’s just call it the iPhone 5 for now). But while it’s sometimes fun to dive into rumors, I’ve noticed that, this time around, the rumor-mill is particularly boring. And it will likely remain yawn-inducing until the next iPhone’s launch. Why? Because we already went through this last year. In the run-up to the iPhone 4S’ release, there were multiple reports from trusted sites about a new iPhone with a slimmer design and a larger screen. We saw legitimate-looking iPhone 5 cases, and some fans even created a semi-realistic iPhone 5 mockup. And thanks to the new iPad, we can predict some of the features  — in particular, LTE 4G –  that the new iPhone will sport. Aside from revealing a new naming scheme (and after the new iPad, we’re sort of expecting that as well), there seems to be little room left for iPhone 5 rumors to truly surprise us. Take the latest bit of speculation from iMore, for example. The site reports the iPhone 5 will have a mini-dock connector that will allow more room for internal components (it already reported this back in February), LTE 4G (no surprise here), and a release in October (again, what pretty much everyone is expecting). iMore’s big revelation: the iPhone 5 may have a screen that’s the same 3.5-inch size as its predecessors (I’m hoping this one isn’t true). But the site also notes the decision hasn’t been finalized yet. Earlier last week, we saw a far sketchier rumor from Reuters (via a South Korean newspaper) claiming the next iPhone would sport a 4.6-inch screen and would be released in the second quarter. While an extremely large iPhone screen seems interesting, everything else about that report rang false. Those iPhone 5 rumors from last year didn’t just come out of thin air — they were likely just a year too early. Based on the past rumors, we expect a new iPhone with a radical redesign, a slightly larger screen, LTE (for sure), and a faster processor than the new iPad’s A5X (hopefully quad-core). Like any iPhone owner, I’m excited to see what Apple comes up with next — but I’m far less amped for several months of rehashed rumors. VentureBeat is holding its second annual MobileSummit this April 2-3 in Sausalito, Calif. The invitation-only event will debate the five key business and technology challenges facing the mobile industry today, and participants — 180 mobile executives, investors, and policymakers — will develop concrete, actionable solutions that will shape the future of themobile industry. You can find out more at our Mobile Summit site. Filed under: mobile, VentureBeat

Avatar

Published

on

Now that the new iPad is out, the tech world is beginning to anxiously report on details about Apple’s next iPhone (let’s just call it the iPhone 5 for now). But while it’s sometimes fun to dive into rumors, I’ve noticed that, this time around, the rumor-mill is particularly boring. And it will likely remain yawn-inducing until the next iPhone’s launch. Why? Because we already went through this last year. In the run-up to the iPhone 4S’ release, there were multiple reports from trusted sites about a new iPhone with a slimmer design and a larger screen. We saw legitimate-looking iPhone 5 cases, and some fans even created a semi-realistic iPhone 5 mockup. And thanks to the new iPad, we can predict some of the features  — in particular, LTE 4G –  that the new iPhone will sport. Aside from revealing a new naming scheme (and after the new iPad, we’re sort of expecting that as well), there seems to be little room left for iPhone 5 rumors to truly surprise us. Take the latest bit of speculation from iMore, for example. The site reports the iPhone 5 will have a mini-dock connector that will allow more room for internal components (it already reported this back in February), LTE 4G (no surprise here), and a release in October (again, what pretty much everyone is expecting). iMore’s big revelation: the iPhone 5 may have a screen that’s the same 3.5-inch size as its predecessors (I’m hoping this one isn’t true). But the site also notes the decision hasn’t been finalized yet. Earlier last week, we saw a far sketchier rumor from Reuters (via a South Korean newspaper) claiming the next iPhone would sport a 4.6-inch screen and would be released in the second quarter. While an extremely large iPhone screen seems interesting, everything else about that report rang false. Those iPhone 5 rumors from last year didn’t just come out of thin air — they were likely just a year too early. Based on the past rumors, we expect a new iPhone with a radical redesign, a slightly larger screen, LTE (for sure), and a faster processor than the new iPad’s A5X (hopefully quad-core). Like any iPhone owner, I’m excited to see what Apple comes up with next — but I’m far less amped for several months of rehashed rumors. VentureBeat is holding its second annual MobileSummit this April 2-3 in Sausalito, Calif. The invitation-only event will debate the five key business and technology challenges facing the mobile industry today, and participants — 180 mobile executives, investors, and policymakers — will develop concrete, actionable solutions that will shape the future of themobile industry. You can find out more at our Mobile Summit site. Filed under: mobile, VentureBeat

Loading...

See original: 

iPhone 5 rumors will be a snoozefest this year

Comments

Myanmar

Digital Revolution and Repression in Myanmar and Thailand

Activists have also proactively published social media content in multiple languages using the hashtags #WhatsHappeningInMyanmar and #WhatsHappeningInThailand to boost coverage of events on the ground.

Avatar

Published

on

By Karen Lee

Loading...

Following the February 1 coup, Myanmar’s netizens became the latest to join the #MilkTeaAlliance, an online collective of pro-democracy youth across Asia.

(more…)

Continue Reading

Ecommerce

How will oil prices shape the Covid-19 recovery in emerging markets?

Oxford Business Group

Published

on

How will oil prices shape the Covid-19 recovery in emerging markets?
– After falling significantly in 2020, oil prices have returned to pre-pandemic levels
– The rise has been driven by OPEC+ production cuts and an improving economic climate
– Higher prices are likely to support a rebound in oil-producing emerging markets
– Further virus outbreaks or increased production would pose challenges to price stability

Loading...

A combination of continued production cuts and an increase in economic activity has prompted oil prices to return to pre-pandemic levels – a factor that will be crucial to the recovery of major oil-producing countries in the Middle East and Africa.

Brent crude prices rose above $60 a barrel in early February, the first time they had exceeded pre-Covid-19 values. They have since continued to rise, going above $66 a barrel on February 24.

The ongoing increase in oil prices, which have soared by 75% since November and around 26% since the beginning of the year, marks a dramatic change from last year.

Following the closure of many national borders and the implementation of travel-related restrictions to stop the spread of the virus, demand for oil slumped globally.

In the wake of the Saudi-Russia price war in early 2020, Brent crude prices fell from around $60 a barrel in February that year to two-decade lows of $20 a barrel in late April, as supply increased and demand plummeted. The value of WTI crude – the main benchmark for oil in the US – fell to record lows of around $40 a barrel last year on the back of a lack of storage space.

While global demand for oil remains low, one factor credited with reversing the trend is the decision to make significant cuts to oil production, which subsequently tightened global supplies.

Read More

Continue Reading

Tech

How the Rural-Urban Divide Plays Out on Digital Platforms

It is one thing for entrepreneurs, whether urban or rural, to create and operate an online store, as some digital platforms have made it relatively easy to manage an e-store – even by using just a smartphone.

Avatar

Published

on

In the West, villages are emptying out due to the lack of economic opportunities. Consider Italy where, in a bid to attract newcomers, a handful of municipalities have turned to selling houses for €1.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14,078 other subscribers

Latest

Trending