Google has been told by the courts that collecting of Wi-Fi data with its Google Street View Cars was not illegal practise but it still has to pay a fine for doing it. It’s been some two years since it came to light that Google was collecting Wi-Fi data while snapping the world’s streets for its Street View service.

The US’ Federal Communications Commission has decided that Google’s ‘accidental’ trawling of this data was not actually illegal but the fact the company delayed an investigation into the affairs means that it will have to pay a $25,000 fine, which equates to around £15,000. Considering that Google has hundreds of billions of pounds in its coffers, we’re guessing the company found this in its pocket change.

Future techGoogle Glasses seen in the wildGood faith

A spokesperson said of the FCC’s verdict:

“We worked in good faith to answer the FCC’s questions throughout the inquiry, and we’re pleased that they have concluded that we complied with the law.”

The FCC noted that Google “deliberately impeded and delayed” the investigation, explaining: “Although a world leader in digital search capability, Google took the position that searching its employees’ e-mail ‘would be a time-consuming and burdensome task’.”Related StoriesiTunes 11 to properly embrace iCloud and iOS 6?Spotify Play button revealed – legal music coming to whole of webGoogle unveils a ‘more beautiful’ Google+New domain name deadline extended by ICANN following software hitchFacebook and Apple ‘will stifle innovation’ online, says Google

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Google Steet View Wi-Fi data swoop deemed legal

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