Connect with us

Tech

HTML5 vs. native vs. hybrid mobile apps: 3,500 developers say all three, please

Telerik Dec. 4 – 5, 2013 Redwood City, CA Tickets on Sale Now The debate actually precedes the first app store to hit volume. Should you build mobile apps in native code on each platform, or should you build them in cross-platform code, such as HTML5? Increasingly, however, developers are side-stepping that debate and just voting for whatever makes sense in each individual circumstance, according to a survey of 3,500 developers, CIOs, and CTOs. That’s a bit of a change from last year, when 94 percent of developers were betting on HTML5 to win. In fact, 40 percent of developers have started building native, only to switch to HTML5, and 31 percent have started building cross-platform, only to switch to native. “Developers … are quickly realizing that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution for their mobile development process,” Todd Anglin, a EVP at cross-platform development toolmaker Telerik said in a statement. “The choice between native and hybrid approaches is dependent on business needs, app requirements, developer skill, development timeline, and other factors.” There is a slight uptick in the number of developers who are going pure HTML5 rather than native, with 41 percent of developers building cross-platform apps rather than native apps, up from 36 percent in January of 2013. And there’s a somewhat significant drop in the number of developers who build pure native, all the time: eight percent, down from 15 percent earlier this year. But most developers continue to use hybrid development methods, with some native apps built with HTML code, some hybrid apps that incorporate native components with shared, cross-platform components, and some apps built in pure cross-platform code. The big question is whether HTML5, which builds app-like interactivity and capability into a web-native format, is enterprise-ready. The answer, according to Telerik’s survey, is that a full third of developers say it is, right now, while a quarter say it will be in the next 12 months. A big chunk of developers, however — 43 percent — say that HTML5 won’t be enterprise-ready before at least a year. And some unbelievers, six percent, say it never will be. That’s a little odd, as 91 percent of respondents said they are already developing with HTML5 — with more projects ongoing on desktop than mobile. And 53 percent said that HTML5 is the way to go multi-platform while also having the benefit of being web-native. Just four percent are developing for iOS only, and just 13 percent are simultaneously developing native apps for all of the web, iOS, and Android. Interestingly, Steve Jobs originally didn’t want native apps on the iPhone, instead preferring web apps. Of course, after the launch of the iOS app store, that all changed, and the tremendous success of Google Play shows a huge amount of interest in native apps in general, not just on iPhone. Today, however, developers are not so religious about native, cross-platform, or hybrid apps, choosing to focus more on what meets the need of each individual project. “When considered in context, we’re seeing plenty of cases where hybrid is the right choice for a given app, and others where native still makes the most sense,” Anglin said. “What developers need, then, are tools that can help them be effective, regardless of the chosen approach.” VentureBeat is creating an index of the most exciting cloud-based services for developers. Take a look at our initial suggestions and complete the survey to help us build a definitive index. We’ll publish the official index later this month, and for those who fill out surveys, we’ll send you an expanded report free of charge. Speak with the analyst who put this survey together to get more in-depth information, inquire within.

Published

on

Telerik Dec. 4 – 5, 2013 Redwood City, CA Tickets on Sale Now The debate actually precedes the first app store to hit volume. Should you build mobile apps in native code on each platform, or should you build them in cross-platform code, such as HTML5? Increasingly, however, developers are side-stepping that debate and just voting for whatever makes sense in each individual circumstance, according to a survey of 3,500 developers, CIOs, and CTOs. That’s a bit of a change from last year, when 94 percent of developers were betting on HTML5 to win. In fact, 40 percent of developers have started building native, only to switch to HTML5, and 31 percent have started building cross-platform, only to switch to native. “Developers … are quickly realizing that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution for their mobile development process,” Todd Anglin, a EVP at cross-platform development toolmaker Telerik said in a statement. “The choice between native and hybrid approaches is dependent on business needs, app requirements, developer skill, development timeline, and other factors.” There is a slight uptick in the number of developers who are going pure HTML5 rather than native, with 41 percent of developers building cross-platform apps rather than native apps, up from 36 percent in January of 2013. And there’s a somewhat significant drop in the number of developers who build pure native, all the time: eight percent, down from 15 percent earlier this year. But most developers continue to use hybrid development methods, with some native apps built with HTML code, some hybrid apps that incorporate native components with shared, cross-platform components, and some apps built in pure cross-platform code. The big question is whether HTML5, which builds app-like interactivity and capability into a web-native format, is enterprise-ready. The answer, according to Telerik’s survey, is that a full third of developers say it is, right now, while a quarter say it will be in the next 12 months. A big chunk of developers, however — 43 percent — say that HTML5 won’t be enterprise-ready before at least a year. And some unbelievers, six percent, say it never will be. That’s a little odd, as 91 percent of respondents said they are already developing with HTML5 — with more projects ongoing on desktop than mobile. And 53 percent said that HTML5 is the way to go multi-platform while also having the benefit of being web-native. Just four percent are developing for iOS only, and just 13 percent are simultaneously developing native apps for all of the web, iOS, and Android. Interestingly, Steve Jobs originally didn’t want native apps on the iPhone, instead preferring web apps. Of course, after the launch of the iOS app store, that all changed, and the tremendous success of Google Play shows a huge amount of interest in native apps in general, not just on iPhone. Today, however, developers are not so religious about native, cross-platform, or hybrid apps, choosing to focus more on what meets the need of each individual project. “When considered in context, we’re seeing plenty of cases where hybrid is the right choice for a given app, and others where native still makes the most sense,” Anglin said. “What developers need, then, are tools that can help them be effective, regardless of the chosen approach.” VentureBeat is creating an index of the most exciting cloud-based services for developers. Take a look at our initial suggestions and complete the survey to help us build a definitive index. We’ll publish the official index later this month, and for those who fill out surveys, we’ll send you an expanded report free of charge. Speak with the analyst who put this survey together to get more in-depth information, inquire within.

Read article here: 

HTML5 vs. native vs. hybrid mobile apps: 3,500 developers say all three, please

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Myanmar

Digital Revolution and Repression in Myanmar and Thailand

Activists have also proactively published social media content in multiple languages using the hashtags #WhatsHappeningInMyanmar and #WhatsHappeningInThailand to boost coverage of events on the ground.

Published

on

By Karen Lee

Following the February 1 coup, Myanmar’s netizens became the latest to join the #MilkTeaAlliance, an online collective of pro-democracy youth across Asia.

(more…)
Continue Reading

Ecommerce

How will oil prices shape the Covid-19 recovery in emerging markets?

Published

on

How will oil prices shape the Covid-19 recovery in emerging markets?

– After falling significantly in 2020, oil prices have returned to pre-pandemic levels
– The rise has been driven by OPEC+ production cuts and an improving economic climate
– Higher prices are likely to support a rebound in oil-producing emerging markets
– Further virus outbreaks or increased production would pose challenges to price stability

A combination of continued production cuts and an increase in economic activity has prompted oil prices to return to pre-pandemic levels – a factor that will be crucial to the recovery of major oil-producing countries in the Middle East and Africa.

Brent crude prices rose above $60 a barrel in early February, the first time they had exceeded pre-Covid-19 values. They have since continued to rise, going above $66 a barrel on February 24.

The ongoing increase in oil prices, which have soared by 75% since November and around 26% since the beginning of the year, marks a dramatic change from last year.

Following the closure of many national borders and the implementation of travel-related restrictions to stop the spread of the virus, demand for oil slumped globally.

In the wake of the Saudi-Russia price war in early 2020, Brent crude prices fell from around $60 a barrel in February that year to two-decade lows of $20 a barrel in late April, as supply increased and demand plummeted. The value of WTI crude – the main benchmark for oil in the US – fell to record lows of around $40 a barrel last year on the back of a lack of storage space.

While global demand for oil remains low, one factor credited with reversing the trend is the decision to make significant cuts to oil production, which subsequently tightened global supplies.

Read More

Continue Reading
Wise

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14,097 other subscribers

Recent