Connect with us

Tech

Teaching artificial intelligence to connect senses like vision and touch

In Canadian author Margaret Atwood’s book “Blind Assassins,” she says that “touch comes before sight, before speech. It’s the first language and the last, and it always tells the truth.”

Avatar

Published

on

Teaching artificial intelligence to connect senses like vision and touch


In Canadian author Margaret Atwood’s book “Blind Assassins,” she says that “touch comes before sight, before speech. It’s the first language and the last, and it always tells the truth.”

While our sense of touch gives us a channel to feel the physical world, our eyes help us immediately understand the full picture of these tactile signals.

Robots that have been programmed to see or feel can’t use these signals quite as interchangeably. To better bridge this sensory gap, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have come up with a predictive artificial intelligence (AI) that can learn to see by touching, and learn to feel by seeing.

The team’s system can create realistic tactile signals from visual inputs, and predict which object and what part is being touched directly from those tactile inputs. They used a KUKA robot arm with a special tactile sensor called GelSight, designed by another group at MIT.

Using a simple web camera, the team recorded nearly 200 objects, such as tools, household products, fabrics, and more, being touched more than 12,000 times. Breaking those 12,000 video clips down into static frames, the team compiled “VisGel,” a dataset of more than 3 million visual/tactile-paired images.

“By looking at the scene, our model can imagine the feeling of touching a flat surface or a sharp edge”, says Yunzhu Li, CSAIL PhD student and lead author on a new paper about the system.

“By blindly touching around, our model can predict the interaction with the environment purely from tactile feelings. Bringing these two senses together could empower the robot and reduce the data we might need for tasks involving manipulating and grasping objects.”

Recent work to equip robots with more human-like physical senses, such as MIT’s 2016 project using deep learning to visually indicate sounds, or a model that predicts objects’ responses to physical forces, both use large datasets that aren’t available for understanding interactions between vision and touch.

The team’s technique gets around this by using the VisGel dataset, and something called generative adversarial networks (GANs).

GANs use visual or tactile images to generate images in the other modality. They work by using a “generator” and a “discriminator” that compete with each other, where the generator aims to create real-looking images to fool the discriminator. Every time the discriminator “catches” the generator, it has to expose the internal reasoning for the decision, which allows the generator to repeatedly improve itself.

Vision to touch

Humans can infer how an object feels just by seeing it. To better give machines this power, the system first had to locate the position of the touch, and then deduce information about the shape and feel of the region.

The reference images — without any robot-object interaction — helped the system encode details about the objects and the environment. Then, when the robot arm was operating, the model could simply compare the current frame with its reference image, and easily identify the location and scale of the touch.

This might look something like feeding the system an image of a computer mouse, and then “seeing” the area where the model predicts the object should be touched for pickup — which could vastly help machines plan safer and more efficient actions.

Touch to vision

For touch to vision, the aim was for the model to produce a visual image based on tactile data. The model analyzed a tactile image, and then figured out the shape and material of the contact position. It then looked back to the reference image to “hallucinate” the interaction.

For example, if during testing the model was fed tactile data on a shoe, it could produce an image of where that shoe was most likely to be touched.

This type of ability could be helpful for accomplishing tasks in cases where there’s no visual data, like when a light is off, or if a person is blindly reaching into a box or unknown area.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Comments

Companies

Cyber incidents top most important business risks for Asia-Pacific companies

For the first time ever, Cyber incidents (35% of responses) rank as the most important business risk in Asia-Pacific in the ninth Allianz Risk Barometer 2020

Boris Sullivan

Published

on

Flexible working and cybersecurity

For the first time ever, Cyber incidents (35% of responses) rank as the most important business risk in Asia-Pacific in the ninth Allianz Risk Barometer 2020, relegating perennial top peril Business interruption (BI) (34% of responses) to second place.

(more…)

Continue Reading

Ecommerce

Alibaba confirms $13bn listing in Hong Kong

Alibaba will offer 500 million shares at a maximum of HK$188 apiece, the company said. The number eight is considered auspicious in China.

Avatar

Published

on

Chinese technology giant Alibaba on Friday confirmed plans to list in Hong Kong in what it called a $13 billion vote of confidence in the turbulent city’s markets and a step forward in its plans to go global.

(more…)

Continue Reading

Ecommerce

E-commerce in ASEAN: Digital technology and players

The 50 most-funded e-commerce start-ups in ASEAN have raised $12.6 billion as of July 2019, with most of the funding raised in the last two years

Avatar

Published

on

E-commerce has been the most dynamic segment of the Internet economy in ASEAN over the past three years. The value of e-commerce rose four-fold, from $5.5 billion in 2015 to more than $23 billion in 2018.

(more…)

Continue Reading

Most Read

Upcoming Events

Thu 23

12th World Congress on Alzheimers Disease & Dementia

January 23 @ 9:00 am - January 24 @ 5:00 pm BMT
Feb 12

Future Energy Asia

February 12 - February 14
BITEC
Bangkok
Feb 19

13th World Congress on Nursing and Health Care

February 19 @ 9:00 am - February 20 @ 5:00 pm BMT
Phuket
Phuket city
Mar 11

Food science conferences

March 11 @ 8:00 am - March 12 @ 5:00 pm BMT
Mar 11

Food science conferences

March 11 @ 9:00 am - March 12 @ 5:00 pm BMT

Press Release

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 12,053 other subscribers

Trending