Connect with us

China

EU to capture $70bn of the US-China trade war

Boris Sullivan

Published

on

A new study by UNCTAD looks at the repercussions of existing US and Chinese tariff hikes, as well as the effects of the increase scheduled for 1 March.

“Because of the size of their economies, the tariffs imposed by United States and China will inevitably have significant repercussions on international trade,”

Pamela Coke-Hamilton, head of UNCTAD’s international trade division

The study ( Key Statistics and Trends in Trade Policy 2018) underlines that bilateral tariffs would do little to help domestic firms in their respective markets.

Countries that are expected to benefit the most from US-China tensions are those which are more competitive and have the economic capacity to replace US and Chinese firms.

The study indicates that European Union exports are those likely to increase the most, capturing about $70 billion of US-China bilateral trade ($50 billion of Chinese exports to the United States, and $20 billion of US exports to China).

Japan, Mexico and Canada will each capture more than $20 billion.

East Asia suffers most from trade war

The high volume of Chinese exports affected by US tariffs is likely to hit East Asian value chains the hardest, with UNCTAD estimating that they could contract by about $160 billion.

The higher cost of US-China trade would prompt companies to shift away from current eastern Asian supply chains.

But the shift would not primarily benefit US companies, according to the report.

UNCTAD Trade war diversion chart
UNCTAD Trade war diversion chart shows EU as the big winner of US China trade war

“The effect of US-China tariffs would be mainly distortionary. US-China bilateral trade will decline and replaced by trade originating in other countries”

Pamela Coke-Hamilton, head of UNCTAD’s international trade division

82% captured by firms in other countries

The study estimates that of the $250 billion in Chinese exports subject to US tariffs, about 82% will be captured by firms in other countries, about 12% will be retained by Chinese firms, and only about 6% will be captured by US firms.

“Our analysis shows that while bilateral tariffs are not very effective in protecting domestic firms, they are very valid instruments to limit trade from the targeted country”, Ms. Coke-Hamilton said.

Similarly, of the approximately $85 billion in US exports subject to China’s tariffs, about 85% will be captured by firms in other countries, US firms will retain less than 10%, while Chinese firms will capture only about 5%.

The results are consistent across different sectors, from machinery to wood products, and furniture, communication equipment, chemicals to precision instruments.

Comments

China

Clear skies over Asia’s new foreign investment landscape?

East Asia Forum

Published

on

Compounding the fallout of the US–China trade war, the global pandemic and recession have caused considerable speculation on the future of foreign investment and global value chains (GVCs). But though there is likely to be some permanent change, it will probably not be as great as politicians expect.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

China

Will Myanmar’s coup help China influence ASEAN?

The Myanmar crisis is becoming increasingly tragic, with the military’s use of lethal force now killing over 60 protestors.

Avatar

Published

on

On 16 January 2021, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi concluded a visit to four ASEAN countries. One destination was Myanmar, the upcoming country coordinator of the ASEAN–China dialogue and now centre of international attention after the country’s military seized power.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

China

Rapid growth in China post-COVID makes it ripe for investment

Being “first in and first out” of COVID-19, China is the only country among the G20 that is thought by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to have increased GDP in 2020.

Avatar

Published

on

China’s economy rebounded sharply.

In January 2020 as the world began to learn of COVID-19, many market observers predicted a challenging year for Asia. While there continue to be headwinds from the health and economic crisis, Asia, and China in particular, has demonstrated comparatively advantageous resilience.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14,066 other subscribers

Latest

Trending