The Office of the Royal Society has organized a round-table discussion about the economic hurdles caused by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, which has already decreased Thailand’s monthly household income by 70 percent.

BANGKOK (NNT) – Speaking of post COVID-19 economic recovery, since the government’s new economic team took office, a survey by Suan Dusit Poll reveals that many people want the government to create more jobs, shore up prices of agricultural products and stimulate domestic consumption.

According to the online survey on solutions to economic issues, 85 percent of the respondents want to see more jobs created to solve economic problems at the household level. Other issues include income generation, improving welfare benefits and a supension of debt repayments.

At the community level, they would like the government to focus on shoring up prices of agricultural products, followed by resource optimization, a strengthening of communities and creation of local jobs while regulating middlemen.

At the national level, the respondents want the government to further support the agricultural sector, followed by export and tourism promotion, increasing investor confidence and supporting the industrial sector.

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