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Bangkok dangerous

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Bangkok has been engulfed by smog for the past few days, raising questions about how seriously the authorities are taking the air pollution problem in the Thai capital.

Experts warn of the threat to public health if the unhealthy air quality levels persist, urging authorities to enforce mitigation measures to protect people’s health

It has been almost a week since the PM2.5 level in Bangkok rose significantly, forming a thick layer of smog over the city, but authorities are still scrambling to find solutions to help ease the problem

Spraying water over Greater Bangkok’s sky, trying to produce artificial rain haven’t brought any significant results so far.

“Air pollution is really a silent killer and many Thais underestimate the danger to their health, so not many people protect themselves by wearing a facemask or installing air purifiers at home,” Witsanu said.

in The Nation

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), each year there are more deaths from air pollution than from Aids and malaria combined.

The average deaths every year from these two diseases are around 2.36 million people, while deaths from all kinds of air pollution were as high as 6.3 million.

While warning of serious financial costs to match Witsanu emphasised the importance of the authorities taking air pollution seriously and immediately tackling the problem at its root.

He called for monitoring construction sites and limiting cars on the streets, rather simply telling people to wear facemasks. 

SUGGESTIONS TO IMPROVE BANGKOK’S AIR QUALITY

The Pollution Control Department has introduced measures to improve its system for measuring air quality, but Greenpeace Thailand country director Tara Buakamsri said there is still room for improvement to ensure safe air. Here are his suggestions.

1 Update safe-air standards in line with World Health Organisation recommendations.

2 Set air pollution emission standard for power plant chimneys.

3 Promote the use of clean, renewable fuels in the transportation sector.

4 Improve public transit with broader access and more extensive coverage.

5 Encourage energy efficiency. 

6 Give people incentives to walk, ride bicycles and switch to electric vehicles.

7 Provide easy public access to the pollution monitoring system.

8 Add more urban green space as much as possible.

Source: Greenpeace

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