Connect with us

Tech

How Competitive Gaming Can Become More Popular in Thailand

Compared to South Korea and other Southeast Asian countries such as the Philippines and Indonesia, Thailand lacks support for competitive gaming.

Avatar

Published

on

In Southeast Asia, competitive gaming is hugely popular. A report on global eSports revenue reveals that the eSports industry in South Korea is about 6% of the $1 billion figure.

Loading...

The country supports competitive gaming in a big way, with fans cheering for their favourite players, wearing their merchandise and watching their livestreamed games.

However, eSports haven’t taken off as much in Thailand. Compared to South Korea and other Southeast Asian countries such as the Philippines and Indonesia, Thailand lacks support for competitive gaming.

Better Infrastructure

Something that could make eSports far more popular in Thailand is if better infrastructure was built.

Now, many of the people watching and enjoying competitive gaming tournaments in the country are the ones who play games and watch them livestreamed from their own computers. Competitive gaming isn’t as accessible to a wider audience because of a lack of visibility.

However, there are some plans for new stadiums to be built. For instance, in 2018 virtual reality developer Infofed donated 50 million baht to build the Thailand eSport Arena and eSports Academy, with 100 high-performance computers. 
 

Better Training 

For the small Thailand eSports scene, there are three very popular games: League of Legends, Dota 2 and Arena of Valor. In order to train for these competitive games, players should look outside of the gaming charts and major releases.

For example, poker is known for its reliance on strategic thinking. Both eSports players and online poker pros must be able to multitask. In poker, the practice of multi-tabling is the most telling example.

With poker satellites being available on sites like Redbet, players can take part in poker competitions from anywhere. Both poker and eSports players must also know how to micro-manage, which refers to all the operations that the player must perform on each element or unit of the game.

For example, a StarCraft player will need to manage each unit individually rather than doing group actions for better results. This is obviously much more difficult than applying the same action plan for all units. Micro-management therefore requires some mental gymnastics to monitor and manage many different parameters.

The parallel is easy to do with online poker players, who must not only monitor the course of several games at the same time, but adapt their strategy to each. 

More Local Competitions

Another thing that would help the competitive gaming scene in Thailand grow is if there were more local competitions. Thailand does have the GESC Thailand Dota 2 Pro Circuit Minor, which local team Alpha Red competed in in 2018, however, this competition is not as big as the Dota 2 Major tournaments held in other countries such as China, Germany, and the Ukraine.

If there were more local competitions, there may be more local supports for eSports and other forms of competitive gaming.

eSports and other forms of competitive gaming now make more than $1 billion a year. Thailand could get a larger piece of this revenue if it develops its local scene.

Comments

Facebook

Facebook unplugs Thai military propaganda

Aishwarya Gupta

Published

on

Facebook said it deleted accounts intended for targeted audiences in the southern provinces of Thailand, where Muslim insurgent groups fight with the Thai military.

Loading...
(more…)

Continue Reading

Ecommerce

Has Covid-19 prompted the Belt and Road Initiative to go green?

Oxford Business Group

Published

on

Has Covid-19 prompted the Belt and Road Initiative to go green?
– Covid-19 led to a slowdown in BRI projects
– Chinese overseas investment dropped off in 2020
– Government remains committed to the wide-ranging infrastructure programme
– Sustainability, health and digital to be the new cornerstones of the initiative 

Loading...

Following a year of coronavirus-related disruptions, China appears to be placing a greater focus on sustainable, digital and health-related projects in its flagship Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).

As OBG outlined in April last year, the onset of Covid-19 prompted questions about the future direction of the BRI.

Launched in 2013, the BRI is an ambitious international initiative that aims to revive ancient Silk Road trade routes through large-scale infrastructure development.

By the start of 2020 some 2951 BRI-linked projects – valued at a total of $3.9trn – were planned or under way across the world.

However, as borders closed and lockdowns were imposed, progress stalled on a number of major BRI infrastructure developments.

In June China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced that 30-40% of BRI projects had been affected by the virus, while a further 20% had been “seriously affected”. Restrictions on the flow of Chinese workers and construction supplies were cited as factors behind project suspensions or slowdowns in Pakistan, Cambodia and Indonesia, among other countries.

Read More

Continue Reading

Tech

InMobi partners with Gojek to offer brand solutions to SEA clients

Mobile marketing firm InMobi announced it has partnered with Southeast Asian super app Gojek to develop its advertising, consumer intelligence, and identity resolution for brands in the region.

Avatar

Published

on


Mobile marketing firm InMobi announced it has partnered with Southeast Asian super app Gojek to develop its advertising, consumer intelligence, and identity resolution for brands in the region
Source link

Loading...

Continue Reading

Latest

Most Viewed

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 13,634 other subscribers

Trending