BANGKOK, 18 June 2019 (NNT) – The Department of Internal Trade today invited representatives of 353 private hospitals nationwide to a briefing on the public notification of the prices of drugs, medical supplies and medical services to patients are treated at hospitals.

Internal Trade Department Director General Wichai Phochanakit said the private hospitals need to notify the public of the prices of drugs, which should not include the hospital room, air-conditioning or pharmacist fees.

Overcharging drugs prices

Some hospitals were reported to charge the prices of drugs 8,000-16,000% higher than the average prices.

The private hospitals are currently required to submit the buying and selling prices of drugs to the Department of Internal Trade by July 12.

The prices will be displayed on the department’s website while a QR Code will be provided for people to check the prices at the private hospitals.

The department is not yet taking measures to enforce the setting of the maximum prices of drugs, though some private hospitals may have already overcharged them.

Maximum prices of drugs might be legally enforced

The maximum prices of drugs might be legally enforced if those hospitals continue to overcharge.

Any change in the prices of drugs is to be publicly notified 15 days in advance so that the new prices will be updated online.

The hospitals are to notify the fees for initial medical treatment, so patients can decide in advance. That is in line with standard procedures of the World Health Organization.

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