Although criminal liabilities are of key concern and often seen as frightening risks for many businesses in Thailand, especially for foreign directors or executives, business operators may find themselves currently unequipped or that some businesses are more susceptible to criminal liabilities than others.  

Criminal liabilities can be imposed in a variety of ways by numerous government agencies using different tactics just within Thailand, which could be a significant challenge for corporations, directors, and executives seeking to establish thorough safeguards to defend themselves.

This session will explore case studies and precedents of company directors being susceptible and jointly liable in criminal lawsuits, elaborate on the procedural steps involved from filing of a criminal complaint to dawn raids, highlight key risks which could extend to employees at the management level, and prepare businesses with the recommended course of action should their directors face accusations.

Read More

Many laws in Thailand contain a provision stating that, in the event an entity commits an offense, its directors, manager, or the person responsible for the business operations of that entity (collectively referred to here as the “director” or “you”) will be criminally and personally liable on the same grounds (or will receive a fine or imprisonment term at a different level, as the case may be). Examples of such legislation include the Act Prescribing Offenses Relating to Registered Partnerships, Limited Partnerships, Limited Companies, Associations, and Foundations B.E. 2499 (1956); the Immigration Act B.E. 2522 (1979); and the Consumer Protection Act B.E. 2522 (1979).

About the author

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Get notified of our weekly selection of news

You May Also Like

An Introduction to Double Taxation Avoidance in Vietnam

Double taxation avoidance agreements (DTAAs) help businesses from being double-taxed on their income. This also applies to businesses, legal entities, and individuals. Vietnam currently has approximately 80 DTAAs signed.

Vietnam Increases weekly Overtime Hours quota to 60 hours

Vietnam’s National Assembly passed a Resolution on March 23 to increase overtime working hours from the current 40 hours to 60 hours a month. However, the total number of overtime working hours cannot exceed 300 hours annually.

Thai Cabinet Approves Crypto-Friendly Tax Rules

The new rules will offer traders several benefits, including exemption from value-added taxes, settlement of losses and higher crypto trading activity in Thailand.