Some of the computer dongles that come with wireless keyboards and mouses may offer hackers a fairly simple way to remotely access and take over your computer, according to a new report from Internet-of-things security startup Bastille.

Atlanta-based Bastille says it has determined that a number of non-Bluetooth wireless keyboards and mouses from seven companies—including Logitech, Dell, and Lenovo—have a design flaw that makes it easy for hackers from as far as about 90 meters away to pair with the dongle.

“Once infiltrated, which can be done with $15 worth of hardware and a few lines of code, a hacker has the ability to insert malware that could potentially lead to devastating breaches,” Bastille engineer Marc Newlin said in a statement Tuesday.

Billions of wireless keyboards and mice are vulnerable to hijacking with inexpensive radio transmitters, potentially letting hackers type arbitrary commands to computers hooked to the devices from up to 100 meters away, warns security firm Bastille.

The vulnerability, which the company has dubbed MouseJack, lets hackers impersonate certain non-Bluetooth wireless mice and keyboards from companies including Logitech, Dell, and Microsoft, according to Bastille.

Hackers could then type commands on the computer as if they were the current user, potentially letting them delete files or install malware, the company says.

 

About the author

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Get notified of our weekly selection of news

You May Also Like

China continues to lead global e-commerce market with over $2 trillion sales in 2022

China accounted for over 37% share in the global e-commerce market, in terms of payments value in 2021. The country was followed by the US with $1.5 trillion, while the UK stood at a distant third with $292.1 billion in 2021

Which emerging market universities are driving growth in patent filing?

According to the UN World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), a record 277,500 international patents were filed in 2021. China was once again the world’s top filer, having overtaken the US in 2019.

Fintech: the natural response to a quarantined economy

During the global lockdown, MSMEs needed Financial Technology (fintech) to keep business operations going. FinTech companies also provided an intrinsic relief to business owners that were at risk of getting sick by continuing to operate manually.