Anyone who’s ever tried to lose more than a few pounds knows the harsh raw power of the bathroom mirror and the bathroom scales. For some of us, weighing in every day and looking at ourselves naked is all the motivation we need to hit the gym and eat better. 

For others, however, it can be the opposite — because it can provide a distorted picture of how well your new diet and exercise routine is working for you. Build muscle and you’ll be healthier, for example, but you may also weigh a little more. A mirror can’t show how your body is changing on the inside.

Body fat measurement is where it’s at, but good luck getting a set of scales that can tell your fat percentage with any accuracy; they’re generally anything up to 8% out.

The Naked 3D Fitness Tracker, which goes on pre-order Thursday for $499, seems poised to change the whole body measurement game. It’s an amazing, high-tech, beautifully-designed system saddled with a questionable name. 

Naked Labs, the Ph.D-filled Silicon Valley startup behind the device, missed a trick not calling this the magic mirror. Because that’s exactly what it is. The mirror is equipped with Intel RealSense Depth Sensors. It scans your body while the Bluetooth-connected scales also act as a turntable. 

Result: a full 3D scan of your body in 20 seconds, delivered to an app, that lets you track your…

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