The first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak in Thailand has come to an end after the country has not seen a case of local or community infection for 44 consecutive days, according to Thailand’s Disease Control Department.

Dr. Anupong Sujariyakul, an expert attached to the Disease Control Department, warned, however, that Thailand must now be prepared for the possibility of a second wave of infections.

As the contagion is still spreading in many parts of the world, with several countries already experiencing a second wave, Thailand said yesterday that the country may extend its international flight ban again.

Possible extension of the flight ban

The Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT) has cited the possibility of extending the international flight ban, due to concerns over the global COVID-19 situation.

Thailand today recorded no new cases of Covid-19 over a 24-hour period, the government’s Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration said on Friday (July 10).

Two additional recoveries were also recorded today, bringing recoveries to 3,087, while cumulative infections remained at 3,202. The death toll remains at 58, with 57 patients still being treated in hospital. It was also the 46th day without any domestic cases.

Bangkok “New Normal”

 The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) is also promoting Bangkok to see and get a feel of what the ‘New Normal’ is like.

Thailand has set up a COVID-19 testing laboratory inside Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi Airport. It’s thought to be the first in Southeast Asia.

The lab will analyse swab tests on-site. Once foreigners are approved to come to Thailand for business on a short-term stay of less than seven days, they will have to go through a swab test at Suvarnabhumi after touching down.

The Thai government has confirmed the requirements for people wishing to enter the country amid the coronavirus pandemic.

While Thailand’s borders remain closed to tourists, certain groups of foreigners are allowed to enter the country.

These groups are:

  • Persons who hold a valid certificate of residence
  • Spouses, parents or child of a Thai national
  • Work permit holders
  • Students of Thai educational institutions
  • Persons who are in need of medical treatment in Thailand

All people in the aforementioned groups are required to have health insurance covering COVID-19, a fit to fly certificate and undergo quarantine once they return to Thailand. 

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