Myanmar has four currency rates, no credit rating, and a shiny new stock exchange that doesn’t yet trade.

Those are some pieces of the financial puzzle that Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy inherited when it took control of Parliament on Feb. 1.

After five decades of military rule, the former dissident’s party will need to grapple with those and other legacies of the country’s isolation.

Investors see potential in the country of about 56 million people. Myanmar has a capitalist culture—it developed a sophisticated black market during the junta’s rule—and natural resources.

The country may end up being among the fastest-growing in the world this year: The International Monetary Fund forecasts an 8.4 percent increase in real gross domestic product in 2016.

Meanwhile, the Central Bank of Myanmar is racing to put into place the financial infrastructure needed to cope with an expected influx of foreign investment and trade.The central bank granted preliminary licenses to nine foreign lenders in October, including Australia & New Zealand Banking Group and Industrial & Commercial Bank of China. They’re expected to engage in institutional banking to facilitate the entry of foreign investors. The central bank has said it plans to award a second round of licenses this year.

Source: This Southeast Asian Economy Is Almost Ready for Its Opening Bell – Bloomberg Business

About the author

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Get notified of our weekly selection of news

You May Also Like

French oil company TotalEnergies withdraws from Myanmar

TotalEnergies has not been able to meet the expectations of many stakeholders (shareholders, international and Burmese civil society organisations), who are calling to stop the revenues going to the Burmese state through the state-owned company MOGE from the Yadana field production.

Myanmar: 1.6 million jobs were lost in 2021 says ILO

Working hours are estimated to have decreased 18 per cent in 2021 relative to 2020, equivalent to the working time of at least 3.1 million full-time workers. These working-hour losses were driven by employment losses as well as increased underemployment.